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Assayer of Student Opinion.

The Prospector

Assayer of Student Opinion.

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‘Mining’ towards a golden future

Although+in+different+phases+of+life%2C+each+student+shares+the+passion+and+drive+to+following+their+dreams.
Iziah Moreno
Although in different phases of life, each student shares the passion and drive to following their dreams.

From playing hide and seek during recess to walking across stage to graduate, 12 years of education ends for some, while others may choose to continue to earn a higher education. The dream of wanting to become a doctor, astronaut, scientist, or artist, finally becomes a reality once students start their college careers. From elementary to middle school then high school, the choices are endless when it comes to thinking about the future of higher education.  

As graduation is on the horizon for many high schoolers or those early in education, thoughts about their own future comes to mind.  

Seven-year-old Zoe Lopez aspires to be a math or science teacher one day.  

“My favorite part of going to school is when I start the class, but my favorite class is science,” Zoe Lopez said. “You can do a lot of things in science.”  

Even as a second grader, Zoe Lopez has big dreams.  She says she is excited to attend UTEP one day and be like her big brother who is also attending UTEP.  

Students in middle school are also getting ready to prepare for high school. 12-year-old Abigail Lopez wants to pursue a career in working for the justice system as a lawyer, and she says she hopes to attend UTEP.  

“I would like to be a lawyer when I grow up because I would like to work for justice,” Abigail Lopez said. “I think it’s important because you can expand your education.”  

The daunting feeling of crossing the stage to earn a high school diploma isn’t so scary for Amelia Guzman.  Graduating from high school at 18 years old, Guzman says she hopes to attend Texas State University.  

When it comes to making a college decision, it can be difficult to want to leave one’s hometown to go somewhere else, especially when being family oriented or having close friends from childhood.  

“I want to leave, but I also don’t know where to go and then I was scared to leave so I was like, I’m going to stay, “Guzman said. “Then I was like, no, I can’t let fear stop me.”  

Guzman is feeling the roar of different emotions as she is getting ready to cross the stage.  

“I feel I’m a very responsible person, so I think I’m already a person that’s ready for college, so it’s also hard, but at the same time, it’s exciting and fun, but also sad because I’m not ready to leave high school,” Guzman said. 

Having no set major in mind, Guzman is changing her mind as her interests are set in different areas. Guzman’s number one thing in mind is to be a pilot in the Air Force. 

“I’m thinking about Engineering but the number one thing on my mind today is being a pilot in the Air Force,” Guzman said. “I don’t know what I want to major in yet, I’m thinking about engineering, so if I’m not able to be a pilot, I’ll be an engineer in the Air Force, but I just know I’m set on going to the Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) and finish College as an officer.”  

Guzman believes that college is essential to be able to succeed in life. 

“Pursuing higher education is important because there’s so much to learn,” Guzman said. “What makes it is the people you’re around, but I always want to learn new things. High school sets you for life and college sets you for your future and it’s important to learn so you can succeed.” 

Starting from elementary to high school, life changes so fast, but the dreams of these students are ones that they are willing to chase. Congratulations to those moving on and may the dreams continue to live on.  

Avery Escamilla-Wendell is the arts & culture editor and may be reached at [email protected] or Instagram @by_avery_escamilla. 

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About the Contributors
Avery Escamilla-Wendell
Avery Escamilla-Wendell, Arts & Culture Editor
Iziah Moreno
Iziah Moreno, Contributor/Photographer
Iziah Moreno is a contributor for The Prospector. He is a freshman majoring in multimedia journalism with a minor in marketing. After graduation, he hopes to work in the world of photojournalism and media.
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