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E-EDITION

Strutting through San Jacinto; the El Paso Strong Fashion Show

Designer+Sergio+Estrada+%28left%29+poses+with+his+models+in+his+work.
Daniela Gonzalez Bustamante
Designer Sergio Estrada (left) poses with his models in his work.

A total of four years has passed since the 2019 Walmart shooting. As time moves forward, the memory of the day will never be forgotten. Within the past years, art has been a gateway to express the love and appreciation the community has for El Paso.  

With much passion for the borderland, Designer of ‘Junk Approved’, Janace Walker threw the El Paso Strong Fashion Show (EPSFS.) For many creative individuals, their inspiration derives from certain muses, which leads to creating something on their own. To commemorate the families that were affected, the survivors and the entire borderland Walker collaborated with The Queen Has Spoken (TQHS) Modeling Agency to throw the El Paso Strong Fashion Show (EPSFS.)  

As the Creative Director of the fashion show, Walker and The Queen Has Spoken (TQHS) Modeling Agency share that their inspiration comes from the community. With much passion for the borderland, local designers give the public a glance at spectacular clothing pieces.  

Walker spoke about how the event is about bringing the community together and making the bond stronger after the 2019 Walmart shooting. Walker expresses how the event is a way to reclaim pride as locals.  

“El Paso is such a safe place,” Walker said. “Something like that, I want people to not let it leave their minds because that’s when it continues to happen.” 

Walker talks about how community involvement masks any hate and how the EPSFS repurposes a tragic event into something extraordinary.  

“When they see people come together for El Paso Strong and know that ‘hey, we haven’t forgot and we’re not okay with it and we’re still going to stand together,’ this is gorgeous, this is wonderful,” Walker said. 

With El Pasoans roaming downtown, the crowd was filled with wandering eyes looking at the clothing collections designers had in store at the San Jacinto Plaza.  

Beyond the fashion show, there were food trucks, vendors and live performances from local artists.

As the night progressed and the full moon rose above the borderland, more looks were being served on the runway. Sergio Estrada, designer of ‘6par6noid6’ gives the community a taste of industrial-edge clothing.  

Estrada shares how it felt to have his work be seen by the public and be a part of the fashion show team. 

“I’m really excited and I love everything about the event that they’re doing,” Estrada said. “They’re doing it in honor of the survivors of the past shooting we all know that happened at Walmart. I like that we can take it into a celebration and do something bigger.”  

The designer displayed a variety of patchwork fabric pieces, chains and unique spikey hat accessories. The collection also comprised of oversized shirts and tops as well as bold denim work pants that scream punk.  

“I feel like I bring a different edge,” Estrada said. “We only have Hot Topic in El Paso but there’s more aesthetics than that. I just want to put the younger people and the city on because we’re not that fashion-forward if we’re being honest. I want to elevate myself and the whole city but most importantly my city.” 

The entire night brought joy and glee to all attendees. Excitement and opportunity filled the air, especially for model Socorro Ortiz who put on numerous looks from different sets of designers throughout the entire night. Ortiz shares how it felt to be representing the designer’s hardworking craft.  

“I feel amazing, this is actually my first show,” Ortiz said. “It is so cool to be out here seeing all these different styles and it is so cool to be the canvas for these artists. It’s amazing to be able to wear what they’ve created by hand and from scratch.”  

With the full moon beaming and the fashion show concluding, a new purpose ignites within the Sun City. Sparking a new wave of expressing individuality and talents within the community.  

Marco Hinojosa is the audience and engagement editor and may be reached at [email protected].

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About the Contributors
Marco Hinojosa
Marco Hinojosa, Audience and Engagement
Marco Hinojosa is the audience and engagement editor for The Prospector. He is a junior at the University of Texas at El Paso majoring multimedia journalism with a minor in criminal justice. He plans to broaden his horizons as a journalist and work for a major broadcast company.
Daniela Gonzalez Bustamante
Daniela Gonzalez Bustamante, Contributor/Photographer
Daniela Gonzalez Bustamante is a contributor/photographer for The Prospector. She is a freshman majoring in communications. She plans to work as a sport social media manager. She also has her small photography business Cre8tive.dani which she plans to continue to grow.
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