Local event celebrates El Paso’s queer community

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Local event celebrates El Paso’s queer community

Huntyy B Liqouren, 24, performs at The House 9 in Central El Paso Aug. 30, 2019.

Huntyy B Liqouren, 24, performs at The House 9 in Central El Paso Aug. 30, 2019.

Carolina Alvarez

Huntyy B Liqouren, 24, performs at The House 9 in Central El Paso Aug. 30, 2019.

Carolina Alvarez

Carolina Alvarez

Huntyy B Liqouren, 24, performs at The House 9 in Central El Paso Aug. 30, 2019.

Paulina Spencer, Staff Reporter

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People in colorful outfits and traditional Mexican attire gathered for The House 9: Revolt! near Myrtle Avenue on FridayAug. 30. 

The event encouraged queer people of all ages to express themselves through art, clothes, make up and music. Local performer Lavender Thug, 19, hosted the event and picked “Chicanx Pride” as the category of the month. 

“It’s about love, first and foremost. It’s a space where queer people can come together and feel safe and seen. I want to encourage people to want to be the odd one and be free and express themselves,” Thug said. 

The event is inspired by the culture of New York’s queer people of color during the 1980s, Thug explained. Local art, music and talent was featured during the eventPeople of all ages danced and sang to the music of local artists such as Tony Jupiter and Puta Kahlo.  

Paintings, jewelry, photographs and prints all created by local artists were displayed and available for purchase. 

Bianca Hernandez, who sat behind a table holding her handmade jewelry and art, said the event gave her an opportunity to showcase her art, which she considers to be empowering to women.  

“I draw and paint darker women to empower them,” said Hernandez. 

Hugo Hinojosa, 20, shared a gallery of men portraying what society might consider feminine characteristics and activities, such as wearing flower crowns and makeup. The gallery was created to resist social norms and expectations regarding gender roles.  

This gallery is to show men how they can be free and express masculinity in a different way,” Hinojosa said 

Thug referred to the event as a “house for everyone” and local artist Chantall Gonzalez agreed 

It opens doors to equality with artists and the LGBT community,” Gonzalez said.  

Gonzalez stood proudly next to a table that showcased the earrings, rings and necklaces with skulls in the style of La Catrina that she was selling.  

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