Red Hot Chili Peppers’ new album a ‘dark necessity’

Julia Hettiger, Entertainment Editor

The newest music from the Red Hot Chili Peppers can be described as a combination of both renewal and survival. In their new album, “The Getaway,” the Chili Peppers seemingly break the mold of their older work to fit in with what is popular on the charts nowadays, combining familiar-sounding lyrics with upbeat, poppy music.

Although the songs unfortunately sound like something you’d frequently hear on the radio, the album is saved by lead singer Anthony Kiedis’ always impressive vocals and the fact that none of their albums have the same vibe, creating room for experimentation.

The first song, taking on the name of the album, is a first glance at this transition. At first, the song sounded like a Spotify commercial, and it was shocking to hear Kiedis start singing. Once past this song, their talent definitely returns.

“Dark Necessities,” sounds a bit like their old stuff, having been remixed a little. The funky vibe and lyrics in this song are what really make it great. Along with background singers, Kiedis sings that “dark necessities are a part of his design,” a line that sends chills up your spine.

The third song, “We Turn Red,” is probably the biggest example of this new era of music. The beginning of the song, besides Kiedis’ voice, sounds like someone else entirely. As the song continues, their familiar sound returns, but overall it still has a different feel to it, leaving a weird aftertaste.

After the third song, the album deviates back to some classic-sounding songs. “The Longest Wave,” “Goodbye Angels” and “Sick Love” all have roots to some of their original work, and it’s refreshing having some good, old Chili Peppers tunes.

“Go Robot,” the seventh song on the album, was definitely one of the more interesting songs on the album. The Red Hot Chili Peppers are probably one of only a few bands who can write a strange song about a robot and be successful in doing so.

“Feasting on Flowers” has a more distinctive sound than any of the songs on the album, while “Detroit” and “This Ticonderoga” remind you this is new and different.

If there is a songsthat I’d come back to frequently and hit replay over and over again, it would be “Encore.” This song captures the Chili Peppers’ ability to write beautiful, moving songs that bring you to your knees.

The final two songs on the album, “The Hunter” and “Dreams of a Samurai,” were somewhere in the middle of their classic sound and newer songs.

The album was a far stretch from what fans of the Peppers are used to hearing. Although no two albums of theirs sound the same, this one seems to have surpassed sounding familiar at all. While entertaining, it lacks that same feeling that their other albums use to hook you in the beginning. Going in thinking it’ll be another “Stadium Arcadium” or “By The Way” will surely leave you disappointed, but listening simply to appreciate their new sound will leave you satisfied.

The Red Hot Chili Peppers, with their distinctive and always changing vibe, will always be a classic. You have to go in with an open mind and not compare it too much to their old stuff to truly appreciate their new, inevitable sound.

With mostly every genre of music approaching the upbeat, almost pop-sounding side of things to survive, it was only a matter of time before the classics took that road as well, whether it be for their survival or to appeal to newer audiences. Despite this, the Red Hot Chili Peppers have released another album that is sure to stir some controversy, but ultimately end in success. And if anything, at least listeners can still bask in their new, catchy lyrics and the familiar sound of Kiedis’ voice.

Julia Hettiger may be reached at [email protected]