Local tattoo artists make their mark through exhibit

%E2%80%9CThe+Body+as+a+Canvas%3A+History+and+Influence+of+Tattoo+Art%E2%80%9D+is+located+at+The+Union+Gallery%2C+on+the+second+floor+of+the+student+union+building.+

Ruby Cerino

“The Body as a Canvas: History and Influence of Tattoo Art” is located at The Union Gallery, on the second floor of the student union building.

Julia Hettiger, Staff Reporter

[youtube id=”cxKG_aoSfqw”]“The Body as a Canvas: The History and Influence of Tattoo Art” exhibit is now on display at the Union Gallery, at the second floor of the Union Eastand will be up until Feb. 20.

The exhibit was donated to UTEP by tattoo artists from Sun City Tattoo and was organized by students from the Office of Student Life. This is the first time the Office of Student Life has curated an event with Sun City Tattoo.

Myker Yrrobali, the tattoo artist in charge of the exhibit, said that sometimes tattoos are overlooked, so he decided to create this exhibit to educate students on the history and art of tattooing.

The exhibit includes a mix of photos, concept art and sketches that can show students different artistic concepts and the process of getting tattoos.

“We at Sun City Tattoo contributed flash art, which are sheets of tattoo designs for clients to either choose from or get ideas and concepts,” Yrrobali said.

The exhibit also contains photos of different tattoos, the process of tattooing and sketches from prior custom pieces. Drawings of tattoos are hung on the walls all around the room and photos are arranged on the pillars in the center of the room.

Some of the art concepts range from flowers and skulls to religious symbols such as crosses. The photos depict tattoos drawn on several different parts of the body, covering arms, legs, chests and backs.

One wall includes pictures of the earliest people with tattoos and a timeline of the evolution of the tattoo. The timeline depicts tattoos from centuries ago and focuses on their development from the mid-1700s until the present.

The timeline also include pictures of some of the first known tattoo artists, which includes Maud Wagner, who is known to be one of the first female tattoo artists in the U.S.

There is a separate wall that includes the definition of what a tattoo means.

A television is placed toward the front of the gallery and it gives a brief video on drawing and receiving tattoos, and delves into the minds of both the artists and the receivers. The television also shows live documentary footage of tattoos being drawn.

Christian Lopez, junior accounting major, said she has been to previous displays at the Union Gallery before, but has yet to see the tattoo exhibit.

“It sounds really interesting,” Lopez said. “I like tattoos so I may check it out soon.”

On the other hand, Sylvia Horta,  junior accounting major, said she is not a big a fan of tattoos, but she thinks it is normal for tattoos to be prominent at schools and in the work place.

“Personally, I don’t like them, but they’re normal,” Horta said. “Tattoos are art and a way for people to express themselves.

The Union Gallery is opened Monday through Saturday at 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., and on Sunday at Noon to 5 p.m.

The closing reception for the tattoo exhibit will be on Feb.19, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

For more information, contact the Office of Student Life at 747-5648 or  Sun City Tattoo at 779-7282.

Julia Hettiger may be reached at [email protected]